Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 29, 2017 5:00pm-5:45pm BST

5:00 pm
today at 5:00pm: interest rates could rise as early as next month — says the governor of the bank of england. mark carney gives his clearest indication yet that an increase is likely in the "relatively near term". if the economy continues on the track that it's been on, and all indications are that it is, in the relatively near term we can expect that interest rates would increase somewhat. we'll be asking how much of an interest rate rise we can expect. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00pm. former army officer henry bolton is elected as ukip's fourth leader injust over a year. ryanair are offering passengers hit by flight cancellations a 20% discount on rail travel between scotland and london. a former government adviser warns that families could be left homeless and destitute if theresa may presses on with universal credit. a climber from wales has been
5:01 pm
killed by a huge rock fall at yosemite national park in california — his wife is critically ill in hospital. the creation of winnie—the—pooh is the focus of a new british film. we'll get mark kermode‘s thoughts on goodbye christopher robin and the rest of the cinema releases in the film review. our main story at 5:00pm — the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, has given his clearest indication yet that interest rates could rise this autumn — for the first time in a decade. the base rate was cut to the current record low
5:02 pm
of a quarter of one percent, after the eu referendum. since then, the bank has since been under mounting pressure to raise rates to help curb inflation. well, today mr carney told the bbc that they are likely to rise in the "relatively near term." our correspondent simon gompertz reports. it looks like the cost of money, the interest rate on the cash we borrow, is about to go up, because this man, the canadian mark carney who runs the bank of england, has wasted no opportunity to ram home, like he did again this moring, that the bank's base interest rate is on the rise. what we have said is that if the economy continues on the track it has been on, and all indications are that it is, in the relatively near term we can expect that interest rates would increase somewhat. the history is that the bank base rate last went up in 2007. then, after the financial crisis
5:03 pm
in 2009, it was cut to 0.5%. and in the wake of the eu referendum, it was reduced again to an emergency low of 0.25% to calm nerves. now there's another concern — inflation. prices are rising by an average of nearly 3% a year and that is way above what the bank of england is supposed to allow. and traditionally the way it deals with inflation is to raise interest rates, to increase the cost of money, discourage people from spending so much. so in a couple of months' time, just as christmas shopping gets underway, we may have higher rates so more costly mortgages to contend with. so we think interest rates will rise by 0.25% in november. that will take the base rate back up to 0.5% where it has been for the past seven years or so. the crucial thing now is what the bank of england does around communication,
5:04 pm
communicating to businesses and consumers whether this is one and done, just a reversal of the emergency cut post the eu referendum, or whether this is the beginning of a series. this was mr carney‘s firmest indication yet that he would vote for a rate rise in november, although it is the whole of the bank of england's monetary policy committee, nine people including independent economists, who will be taking that decision. simon gompertz, bbc news. ukip have announced their new leader — he is henry bolton. the former army officer is the party's fourth leaderjust over a year. far right candidate and anne marie waters came second. all his victory was announced at the party's conference which is taking place in torquay. let's listen to what he said after his victory was announced. todayis today is not only a crucial day for a party. it is a critical day for oui’ a party. it is a critical day for our country. and we've already heard
5:05 pm
today from a number of speakers of the importance of holding the government to task for the delivery and that mandate that they were given on the 23rd ofjune last which so given on the 23rd ofjune last which so far they have failed to deliver anything on. ladies and gentlemen, brexit is our core task. ladies and gentlemen, brexit is our core task. let's talk to our political correspondent. he was an outsider, really. tell us a bit more about him. he was never named by the bookies as one of the babies but when you spoke to ukip members plenty said that his name was firmly in the mix. give a former soldier, a former policeman, a one—time lib dem. you did what the european union in the past but as you heard him say that, in his a cce pta nce you heard him say that, in his acceptance speech, he made it very clear that brexit must be the party. that will come as a relief to some in ukip will stop they see him as a
5:06 pm
bit of unity candidate after what was a divisive campaign, because the runner—up, the president came second in this race, and robbie waters, had campaigned hard with an anti—islam, anti—sharia law rhetoric. some said was the wrong direction and there we re was the wrong direction and there were threats of resignations had she won so were threats of resignations had she won so henry bolton's victory is being seen as a chance for ukip to unify being seen as a chance for ukip to u nify after being seen as a chance for ukip to unify after what has been a very difficult year. but it has been hard in the party. there was infighting and division. unity may be the goal but getting there still it be that easy. so they have a new leader. they also have a new logo and they have run into some trouble on that, haven't they? they certainly do. this was part of a rebranding exercise of a vote for a rebranding exercise of a vote for a new logo which is a lion. the problem is, people have said bears a remarkable similarity to the logo of the premier league and there is even a suggestion that there may be some legal action involved. ukip at the moment are shrugging this up and
5:07 pm
saying, if there is as landy is purely coincidental. this logo was picked by the members here today and youtube is pretty proud of it. but it has caused quite a stir. —— ukip is pretty proud of it. —— ukip is pretty proud of it. a former senior civil servant has urged the government to pause the rollout of its universal credit scheme, which merges six benefits into one. dame louise casey — who was honoured for her work in government helping families and vulnerable people — has told the bbc that the time it takes to deliver the payments could push claimants into the most "dire circumstances" the country has seen in years. i think they should pause on it. i don't say that lightly. i completely agree that we all should be wedded to the principle and therefore the overall policy that work should pay. where they are renting up is that benefits will punish, and i don't think that is the intention of anybody here. and it is about delivery. so the overall strategy
5:08 pm
might be right, the overall intention might be right but the back of the matter is, the actual delivery of it means that some people, because of the waiting time before benefits kick in, will end up in dire circumstances. before benefits kick in, will end up in dire circumstances. joining me now from westminster is ed boyd — former special advisor at the department for work and pensions, with a particular focus on reforming welfare — and now managing director of the centre for socialjustice — a thinktank co—founded by iain duncan smith. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. you heard what dame louise casey has said. a very respected former government adviser, adviser to prime minister is. she says the way this has been implement it makes my hair stand on end. so why not posit? i heard that. and the other thing she said which is important is we should all be wedded to the principle. let's not forget the bigger picture here when we look at what has happened. the odd thousand more people will be in work
5:09 pm
asa thousand more people will be in work as a result of this benefit. it is a transformational thing. it is about the size of bolton, suddenly finding work or having a tremendous effect on families across this country. when it comes to the implementation, the specific rings she raised there, when people get their payments? i think she's mixed a couple of things up. think she's mixed a couple of things simply think she's mixed a couple of things up. simply because this is an issue a few months ago where a function thatjob a few months ago where a function that job centres have a few months ago where a function thatjob centres have this to say to some needs the money upfront, you can get half of it within two weeks. up can get half of it within two weeks. up front, a sadly the same as the old benefit system, if you need it. that is available to everyone, basically. u nless basically. unless they have a huge amount of savings and don't need it. she is saying people are waiting six weeks and they simply cannot cope. it is like falling over the edge of a cliff. that is what she's saying and she does not say this lightly.
5:10 pm
she is a woman of huge experience in this field. she is. and she has done to mentor ‘s work. ijust think on this particular example, she has missed the way that it is being rolled out means that this issue has been fixed. at the people, to universal credit are getting a budget advance and it means they get the payment within two weeks, not six weeks, not ten weeks. to make sure that they can make ends meet. so you are saying some are getting it in two weeks. but there are then, you would concede, some who are waiting six weeks. which, if you on the bread line, is a very long time. absolutely. if someone a very long time. absolutely. if someone is on the bread bun they should get the money within two weeks to make sure they've got another paper that was then, they are eating. 0ur another paper that was then, they are eating. our understanding, you look at the data coming out of the department for work and pensions and thatis department for work and pensions and that is what is happening. there are a number of people like you and i will be paid monthly, at the end of the month, for all our work we been doing. it is exactly what universal credit tries to replicate the whole idea is for those people who can cope with that to be paid at the end of the month, it basically means the world of being out of work is the same of being in work and make the
5:11 pm
transition from one other much more smooth. some people would say that you are kind of ideological you wedded to this. but you helped create it, but now your complacent. why notjust accept these calls notjust now your complacent. why notjust accept these calls not just from dame louise casey, but other tory mps, for pause. what is wrong with that? the right things to change now project your assumption that i'm ideological you wedded to something. we think there are some changes they should make which i will come onto in the second. what i was about to say that these changes that should be made to improve upon universal credit had nothing to do with the pace of it. if we thought the piece that was the issue, and it was going to affect people negatively across the country, we would be saying that. that is not what we're saying. the change of the need to be made, big change, when somebody comes on to universal credit, that i think should be taken away straightaway.
5:12 pm
it was never in the design of the centre for socialjustice set out backin centre for socialjustice set out back in 2009. added to this: when someone back in 2009. added to this: when someone falls out of work and does not have any savings, for the first seven days, doesn't matter when they are paid, the first seven days they will get no money for that period. they are relying on basically their own savings but it didn't have any they are pushed into debt. to pay for that first week. scored a seven day waiting period. we don't think that's necessary and it should be phased out as soon as possible. if we look at all the stories in the data about what actually drives people into debt it is that. it's not about the people are being paid at the end of the month rather than every two weeks. that is a thing we call on the government to look to change. good to talk to you and thank you for being with us. ed boyd, former special adviser at the department for work and pensions. thank you for your time. thank you for your time. the us is to withdraw most of its staff from its embassy in cuba — and warning americans not to visit the country after reports that they suffered mysterious acoustic attacks. about 60 per cent of employees are leaving in response to apparent sonic attacks on diplomats. more than 20 staff have reported experiencing health problems including dizziness and hearing loss.
5:13 pm
cuba denies any involvement in the reported attacks. the president of the european commission has warned that "miracles" are needed for talks on a future trade deal between the uk and eu by the end of next month. jean—claude juncker made the remark ahead of a summit of european leaders in estonia, which is being attended by theresa may. 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee is in the estonian capital, tallinn, for us. good evening. good evening. i good evening. i think good evening. i think it good evening. i think it is fascinating, because you're in the summit was 28 leaders, and to brexit is not something any of them want to talk about. it is about the digital future of europe and it is about future of europe and it is about future of europe without britain. trying to carve out a new path. the french president was important but brexit became almost like the word
5:14 pm
macbeth to those in the theatre. you just don't say the word. so much so that downing street were told politely not to mention it in the room, over dinner last night. today, it was in the sidelines. theresa may to say, by the way, to angela merkel a separate bilateral meeting. to the polish prime ministers welcome to get a cent of their tape. a week on from that florence speech which he talked about having an extra two yea rs talked about having an extra two years added on from 2019 for britain to basically adjust and amends to leave the eu and also readjustments when it comes to the money and also talking more on citizens rights. we're told both leaders, the german polish leaders, like what happened with foreign to believe there is a dynamism that most other leaders kept away from the subject. reggie arrived earlier today, to reason they believed she may have moved the deadlock if not broken it on brexit. broken it on brexit. i have set out in my foreign speech the progress that we've made on a number of issues and the vision that i have for the deep and special partnership that we can develop with the european union in future. i am pleased that
5:15 pm
the negotiations have been making progress and i look forward to developing that deep and special partnership with the eu because i think it is not only the interests of the uk, it's in the interests of the eu as well. the summit itself has just finished, the french president is still speaking at the moment. most of the other leaders including theresa may have now left. what a takeaway from this, this could in months and years to come still be a key summer weather looked at going in different jean—claude younger, the head of the european commission tellingly earlier today in terms of getting to the significant progress box, when they meet in brussels in three weeks' time of their happy to go onto the next days of talks, he says at the moment she believes that will bea at the moment she believes that will be a miracle to get that. that will be a miracle to get that. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the governor of the bank of england gives his clearest signal yet that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten years. ukip has elected a new leader. the
5:16 pm
former army officer and one—time liberal democrat parliamentary candidate henry bolton. manchester city's layout breaks rib after a car crash. england chase 289 to win the final one—day international against west indies after plunkett impresses with the ball again. and frustration in malaysia but champions of leader lewis hamilton, he struggled in second practice, finishing just six by this title rival sebastian vettel who was focused. more on the stories just after half past five. ryanair says it has agreed to implement measures to ensure all passengers affected by recent flight cancellations
5:17 pm
are "fully aware" of their rights and entitlements. the civil aviation authority had given the dublin—based carrier until 5:00pm to sort out compensation arrangements for hundreds of thousands of affected travellers — orface possible action. ryanair had been accused by the aviation regulator of failing to respond to its request to discuss how it is treating passengers whose flights have been cancelled. the aviation minister, lord callanan, has accused ryanair of behaving "disgracefully" towards its passengers — he's in our westminster studio now. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. ryanair has obeyed this deadline, haven't they? this five o'clock deadline for tonight. and given some guarantees, some assurances about passengers rights. it appears so. i have actually seen what they have released but if they have agreed to comply with the law
5:18 pm
and to fulfil their legal obligations to passengers then that isa obligations to passengers then that is a good thing. it sounds on the face of it, that they have been tracked to that by they have been tracked to that by the civil aviation authority deadline of this evening. that seems to be the case with ryanair always. they that seems to be the case with rya nair always. they have that seems to be the case with ryanair always. they have to be dragged kicking and screaming for filling their legal rights. and you know, the aviation authorities an independent body of government and we don't direct what they do but i'm pleased that they have taken action against ryanairand pleased that they have taken action against ryanair and that they are applying the passenger rights legislation as is their duty. what you think then of the way ryanair have what you think then of the way rya nair have been what you think then of the way ryanair have been behaving towards their passengers in general? well, i mean clearly they have behaved pretty disgracefully towards many of them. and we're not asking ryanair to many of them. and we're not asking ryanairto do many of them. and we're not asking ryanair to do anything special here. we're asking them to fulfil their legal obligations that apply to all airlines flying into and out of eu airports. and this should not be
5:19 pm
difficult for them to do. they are well aware of their responsibilities. all other airlines also add to comply with these regulations and it is not picking on ryanair to ask them to do exactly the same. just think the civil aviation authority been tough enough on them? i think they are doing a greatjob. it is difficult to see what else they could have done. they have taken very strong action, distributed very strong letters to ryanairand distributed very strong letters to ryanair and then distributed very strong letters to rya nair and then told distributed very strong letters to ryanair and then told them what the consequences will be they don't comply. it seems that they've issued the required information now. i hope that they also given the legal guarantees that the caa were seeking. that they will provide the compensation that they are supposed to provide alternative routing that they're supposed to provide to passengers that had been inconvenienced by their wholesale cancellations. and we know this affects hundreds of thousands of passengers. to think they will be reassured by what ryanair to think they will be reassured by what rya nair have
5:20 pm
to think they will be reassured by what ryanair have finally come out with tonight? i think they would be reassured when the alternative arrangements are put in place. and they've travelled to the destinations as they should've done. but it is going to inconvenienced many thousands of people because in many thousands of people because in many cases there will be no alternative to the original flights. family events, weddings, funerals etc will be disrupted by this. thank you very much indeed for joining us. thank you for your time. thank you. that was in the spring of last year. let's go to our political correspondent who is at westminster for us. this is going to cause quite a lot of controversy, isn't it? this doubling of the estimated cost.
5:21 pm
yes. it is a big difference and a large amount of the money which makes up this almost doubling of the original estimate for the figure which this repair and refurbishment work would cost is accounted for by effectively a contingency fund. so the overall budget of the project has increased to £261 million, as you say. but around £17 million about is what the house of commons and the house of lords called risk and the house of lords called risk and contingency money. —— 60 £1 million. it is there in case something goes wrong or in the course of the work they discover that in fact more work needs to be done as a result. but a lot of it is the result of 16 months of survey in and the ground around it. which the house of commons commissions say has revealed further work that needs to be done. the stonework needs more attention than they originally thought. the clock faces will need to be re—glaze. the metal up on the
5:22 pm
elizabethtown will need to be re—gilded. all of this has to happen ina re—gilded. all of this has to happen in a carefully choreographed sequence in a carefully choreographed sequence of events to protect and preserve the building as it is now. and restore it to its original glory. and so with that extra work in mind, and the contingency fund as well, as we are hearing today the budget has doubled to £61 million. there was already controversy over the length of time it was going to ta ke the length of time it was going to take that big ben would be out of action forfour years. and only time on special occasions. yes, that's right. there was a lot of controversy, as you say. a lot of anger and upset amongst mps and others that big ben would have to be silenced for so long. and we have not heard a child for several weeks now. back in august it time for the last time was of new year's eve at will, sunday and will, but only on those big important national occasions. there was no mighty row about whether that was a necessary
5:23 pm
step to take and i think as a result of this announcement today we will see probably some further disquiet from mps about the overall cost of this project. jonathan, many thanks. jonathan blake for us at westminster. three former tesco executives have gone on trial — over their alleged role in a multi—million pound accounting scandal. the supermarket‘s former managing director, its finance director and food commercial director are accused of helping to inflate the company's profits in 2014. all three men deny charges of fraud by abuse of position, and false accounting. emma simpson reports from southwark crown court. he is to be tesco's uk boss now accused of abusing his position. so too was this man. he was the uk finance director. and this man, a former commercial director. all jointly accused of massaging the figures. the case centres on tesco's
5:24 pm
accounts. in september 2014 it revealed that it had passed the overstated what was expecting to make in profits. there was a shortfall of £250 million. the accounting scandal was headline news as tesco's share price plummeted and billions wiped off the value of the company. the prosecution alleges that the three men were the generals who were in a position of trust, page huge compensation to safeguard the financial health of the company. not only did they encourage the misrepresentation of figures, they pressurised others under their control. the three men denied all the charges in a trial that is set to last three months. emerson said, bbc news. one of the men accused of kidnapping british model chloe ayling should be extradited to italy to face trial, a judge has ruled. 36—year—old michael herba is accused of snatching miss ayling in milan injuly. the model says she was drugged and held hostage for six days after being lured to a fake photo shoot. mr herba's lawyers have said he will appeal against extradition.
5:25 pm
a stampede at a railway station in the indian city of mumbai, has resulted in the death of at least 22 people. it happened during the rush hour on a narrow pedestrian bridge leading one of the busiest and most congested stations in the city centre. it's emerged that tens of thousands of people with dementia and other conditions are missing out on a council tax discount — which could save them hundreds of pounds a year. the consumer website, moneysavingexpert, has revealed large variations in the number of claims across england, scotland and wales. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports: here you go, mum. there is your soup. vivian has a rare form of alzheimers, for her daughter catherine and the rest of the family organising care was a daunting task but they weren't told they could make big savings on vivian's council tax bill. they found out by chance and were eventually able to claim back thousands of pounds. you have to go out and ask,
5:26 pm
you are never offered the information, that's been one of my biggest issues with this whole journey for the last six years is that we've always had to fight for something to make life better and easier for mum. anyone with what's called a severe mental impairment and eligible for certain benefits can claim a council tax discount, 100% if they live alone or 25% if they live with one other person. but new research shows huge variations in people claiming the reduction. at spelthorne it's ten residents and in east ayrshire only 11, but in east dunbartonshire is 447 and ashford 423, all areas with similar populations. the discount has been given to protect the most vulnerable in society, to give them more funds to make their homes suitable for them to live in as their condition deteriorates. that's a good thing but the fact
5:27 pm
that bureaucratic ineptitude is stopping people getting that discount is not a good scenario. the discount rules apply in scotland, wales and england, a whitehall spokesman giving a view for england said all councils were expected to ensure those entitled to the support did receive it. hugh pym, bbc news. a reminder that in 15 minutes time we will get mark kermode's thoughts on the new film home again. time for a look at the weather... it is not a fantastic weather weekend but there will be some glimmers of sunshine around. we have had a lot of rain around for example today. that then is clearing away now. sunshine is coming out for the latter pa rt now. sunshine is coming out for the latter part of the day. this was in bradford just have an hour ago. a
5:28 pm
beautiful end to the day here. showers following the main rain band but the fog of the uk that has cleared away. will linger in the northern isles. it is dragging its heels across kent and the far south—east of england but showers following on behind could actually be pretty heavy themselves. a rumble of thunder in the north will limit themselves to mostly coastal areas overnight and inland it will turn quite chilly. it could bea it will turn quite chilly. it could be a touch of frost on the grounds of scotland. any metal clearance was the goodies and start to the day. sunshine besting the mcleod doubles up sunshine besting the mcleod doubles up and the showers will become widespread. it will feel a bit fresher tomorrow but with some sunshine, pleasant. does this band of rain comes in later to spoil the day across wales and the south—west pushes its way eastwards through sunday night and hot on its yields another area of rain. we have been talking about the remains are all week. a warmer muggy sort of feel. eventually that soggy weather is blown out of the way. going out of the way by some fairly strong winds. and it will be even windier than for
5:29 pm
the monday morning rush. a few have plans for the weekend please don't make this the last forecast that you see. i will have more than half an hour. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the governor of the bank of england has suggested that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten years — potentially as soon as november. henry bolton has been elected as the new leader of ukip at their conference in torquay, beating anti—islam candidate anne marie waters to the top role. ryanair are offering passengers hit by flight cancellations a 20% discount on rail travel between scotland and london. the government is urged to halt the roll—out of the universal credit benefits system amid warnings families could be left homeless and destitute. time for a check on the sport now with hugh ferris. england have been set 289 to win
5:30 pm
the final one day international of the series against west indies and end their long summer with a victory. after being put in to bat, west indies had a typically fast start from chris gayle. but once he had departed for 40, england were able to restrict the tourists' run rate and also take regular wickets with liam plunkett clinging on to two fine catches, including one off his own bowling to dismiss kyle hope. the other hope brother shai top scored with 72 but after his departure england took control again... plunkett uprooting rovman powell's off stump to leave west indies on 288 for 6 after their 50 overs. england have begun their run chase. a short time ago, they were 40 without loss. manchester city striker sergio aguero has broken a rib following a car crash in amsterdam last night. manager pep guardiola confirmed the injury before he had had a chance to see aguero, who missed training this morning because of
5:31 pm
the incident involving a taxi. he's being assessed by the club's medical team this afternoon. guardiola's told a press conference he wasn't sure how much of the season aguero might miss. 0ur reporter simon stone was there. in terms of aguero, he was clearly in holland. it was his day off, but it was 11 o'clock when he had the accident. is that a problem for you? no. purely because he was on a day off? day off. have you spoken to him? not yet. that will be this morning. but i know he is ok. that is the most important thing. injury problems too at city's neighbours manchester united. managerjose mourinho has confirmed that midfielder paul pogba is out for the long term.
5:32 pm
the french international limped off during united's champions league win over basel on the 12th of september and has missed the reds' last four games. mourinho still wouldn't give a specific timescale on when he will return. tottenham and england midfielder dele alli has been banned for one international match for the gesture he made during the world cup qualifier against slovakia earlier this month. he's also been fined just under £4,000 for making what fifa describe as "an offensive and unsporting gesture" during the game. it means he'll miss the match against slovenia at wembley next thursday. mo marley has been appointed interim head coach of england women, taking overfrom mark sampson, who was sacked by the fa earlier this month. former everton ladies boss marley moves up from her role in charge of the england under—19 team and will first lead the senior side in a friendly against france in october. it hasn't gone too well for lewis hamilton in the practice rounds of the malaysian grand prix. the championship leader slid off the track in the second round, leaving him in sixth place.
5:33 pm
title rival sebastian vettel was quickest. but the session came to an early end after a major crash involving haas driver romain grosjean. birmingham has received official backing from the government to be the uk's candidate city for the 2022 commonwealth games. other countries will have until saturday to make a bid. the commonwealth games federation has suggested birmingham could still face competition from canada, malaysia and australia. staging the event would cost at least £750 million, making it the most expensive sports event in the uk since london 2012. that's all the sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport and 0lly foster will have more in sportsday at 6.30. 50 years ago, a new bbc radio station
5:34 pm
and a new era of pop culture was born. good morning and welcome to the exciting new sound of radio 1. dj tony blackburn announced "the exciting new sound of radio 1" and played the move's flowers in the rain as his opening track. this weekend, radio1 is celebrating its half—century with a series of special programmes. and the man who introduced it all, tony blackburn, is here. 50 yea rs 50 years on, fantastic to see you. i grew up listening to radio 1 and to you, doing my homework to radio 1,
5:35 pm
as millions dead. did you think it was going to be such a stunning success when you played that first track? i thought it was, success when you played that first track? ithought it was, because success when you played that first track? i thought it was, because we have had three years outdoing radio caroline, and that was coming to an end. the bbc were asked by the government at the time to provide this music station. it was a fightback against the pirates? this music station. it was a fightback against the pirate57m this music station. it was a fightback against the pirates? in a way. the time was right for a national pop station and i was asked to open it up, which was a dream come true. i had been out on the north sea for nine months of the year. getting seasick. a little bit. and it was tremendous. and the bbc didn't say, we are going to do it this way. they said, you know how to do it, to kenny everett and myself, show us how it is done. these are
5:36 pm
pictures of you signing autographs and being mobbed in the streets, which i am sure you hated(!) you became stars just like pop stars, because you had massive audiences, 20 million for your show. the first audience was 21 million and then 20 million every morning were listening in. and of course, the linkup with top of the pops as well. in those days, it was a monopoly, so you could make a name for yourself in a couple of weeks, not like now, when there is so much around. and apart from the monopoly, what was the secret of radio 1's success? 0bviously your enormous talent, but what else? they bought in a lot of the pirate radio discjockeys, particularly from radio london, and we introduced the american style of radio and the bbc allowed us to do it. they also got the same jingles. we had wonderfuljingles, which i
5:37 pm
will be playing tomorrow when i recreate the opening of radio 1. it was a success from the word go. we had problems with being allowed to play enough records, because we had needle time restrictions. apart from that, it was a successful. they also have older disc jockeys that, it was a successful. they also have older discjockeys with the younger ones. radio1 has have older discjockeys with the younger ones. radio 1 has obviously evolved over 50 yea rs. younger ones. radio 1 has obviously evolved over 50 years. how do you think it has changed? it is very different now, because there is so much around. i have a 20—year—old daughter and she doesn't listen to so daughter and she doesn't listen to so much radio now. she is on youtube and of course, radio1 has a terrific following on youtube now. we arejust seeing terrific following on youtube now. we are just seeing the live lounge, which is a great innovation. very simple, stars playing live music. when you go to the radio 1 studio, it is like a television studio. they doa it is like a television studio. they do a lot of video stuff and social media. and kids are listening in a
5:38 pm
different way. radio1 has media. and kids are listening in a different way. radio 1 has adapted and they have done well. but unlike radio 2, we have had an easier time at radio 2. i will be doing the re—creation of radio 2, which starts at seven o'clock tomorrow morning on radio 2. that audience that we have now was the radio 1 audience of further back. it is going to be exciting. then i willjoin nick grimshaw, or grimmy, and some of the djs who have been associated with the breakfast show will be coming in as well. so it has been going 50 yea rs. as well. so it has been going 50 years. do you think it could last another 50 years, radio 1? what does it need to do to adapt? well, it is adapting the whole time. it is terrific, the way they have done it. i think it can last for another 50 yea rs. i think it can last for another 50 years. i don't think i will be around to see it, but who knows? as you say, young people listen to music in a very different way.
5:39 pm
totally different, but radio 1 still has an audience of over 10 million. and on youtube, 4 million tune in. you must be proud to be the man who kicked it off. it is such a privileged position, to be the man who played the first record. very exciting. i see myself opening radio 1up quite exciting. i see myself opening radio 1 up quite a bit this week. why did you pick that track? that crashing sound at the beginning, i thought it was just a fun record to start with. and it was a hit at the time. certainly, the move were glad i picked it as well! i look forward to tomorrow. we will listen with interest. pleasure to see you. tony blackburn. a climber from wales has been killed
5:40 pm
at yosemite national park in california. andrew foster, who was 32, was trapped by a massive rock—fall below the face of the huge granite mass known as el capitan on wednesday. his wife is in hospital with serious injuries. 0ur correspondent richard galpin reports. already this week, there have been two major rock falls from the iconic granite dome known as el capitan. for those caught beneath, the only way to stay alive is to get out as fast as possible. the 32—year—old british climber andrew foster didn't make it. he was trapped by rocks weighing more than 1,000 tonnes which fell off el capitan on wednesday afternoon. he and his wife who was injured were checking the routes to the top. they were not actually rock climbing at the time, they were walking along near the base of el capitan, possibly looking at climbing routes, scouting, things like that, and it was just a tragic, tragic situation, the wrong
5:41 pm
place at the wrong time. and yesterday, there was another incident, as more rocks came crashing down the cliff face. this man was injured when a rock came through the roof of their car as they tried to escape. it sounded like thunder. and she looked back and said... i said there is smoke coming out of the mountain. the mountain has exploded, it is falling, falling, so we were driving as far as we could. at the same time, my husband reached up and he said my head, my head, because he was bleeding profusely and hurting. the routes up el capitan, all 3,600 feet of it, are amongst the world's greatest rock climbs and attract experienced mountaineers like andrew foster and his wife lucy. in a statement, patagonia, the outdoor clothing company which andrew foster worked for,
5:42 pm
said: his wife remains in hospital, where she is being treated for serious injuries. richard galpin, bbc news. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the governor of the bank of england gives his clearest signal yet that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten years. ukip has elected a new leader — the former army officer and one—time liberal democrat parliamentary candidate henry bolton. ryanair agrees to make sure passengers affected by cancellations are made aware of their rights. now on bbc news, a look ahead to sportsday at 6.30 tonight. we have a packed programme this
5:43 pm
evening, with the latest on ben stokes, four days after his arrest. his england team have been in action today as well. their last match against the west indies. we look ahead to the weekend football. manchester city have had bad news ahead of the standout match of the weekend against chelsea. sergio aguero has broken rib in a car crash and he is out. we will also get reaction from birmingham. they are one step closer to hosting the commonwealth games in 2022. is all coming up in sportsday with me, 0lly foster, at 6.30. now, time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? the big release is goodbye
5:44 pm
christopher robin, a film about the creation of winnie the pooh. we also have reese witherspoon in home again, a likeable if that rom—com. and daphne, a very interesting and edgy home—grown pick. and daphne, a very interesting and edgy home-grown pick. goodbye christopher robin. i used to make up stories for my kids, so i am fascinated by this. tell me i am going to love it. i really liked it. i know it has divided critics, but it is basically the story of how the winnie the pooh stories came
5:45 pm

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on